Amazing Facts

Types of Fruits




A fruit is the mature ovary of a flowering plant,
together with all
inseparably connected parts of the flower. In nature, fruit is normally
produced after fertilization of ovules has taken place, but in many
plants fruit matures without fertilization. In either case, the
maturation of the ovary results in the withering of stigmas and anthers
and enlargement of the ovary or ovaries. The major service performed by
fruit (in nature) is the protection of developing seeds. In many
plants, fruit also aids in seed distribution.

Types of Fruit


Botanists classify fruits into two main
groups: (1) simple fruits
and (2) compound fruits. A simple fruit develops from a single ovary,
and a compound fruit develops from two or more ovaries.


Simple fruits are classified into two main
groups, depending on
whether their tissue is fleshy or dry. Fleshy simple fruits include
most of the seed-bearing structures that are commonly called fruits.
They are further divided into three main types: (1) berries, (2)
drupes, and (3) pomes.


Berries consist entirely of fleshy tissue, and
most species have many seeds. The seeds are embedded in the flesh.


Drupes are fleshy fruits that have a hard
inner stone or pit and a single seed. The pit encloses the seed.


Pomes have a fleshy outer layer, a paperlike
core, and more than one seed. The seeds are enclosed in the core.


Dry simple fruits are produced by many kinds
of trees, shrubs,
garden plants, and weeds. The seed-bearing structures of nearly all
members of the grass family, including corn and wheat, belong to this
group.


A compound fruit consists of a cluster of
seed-bearing structures,
each of which is a complete fruit. Compound fruits are divided into two
groups, (1) aggregate fruits and (2) multiple fruits.

Aggregate fruits include most of the fruits that are commonly called
berries. Each fruitlet of a blackberry or raspberry is a small drupe;
each “seed” of a strawberry is a dry fruitlet.


Multiple fruits include mulberries, figs, and
pineapples. Mulberry
fruitlets are small drupes; each “seed” in a fig and each segment of a
pineapple is a fruitlet.



   
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